Jason Pierre-Paul re-ups with the Giants
New York Giants NFL

New York Giants Deal with Jason Pierre-Paul a Win-Win for Both Sides

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.Two years ago, Jason Pierre-Paul wanted to get a long-term deal done with the New York Giants. They were not able to do so.

Two years later, JPP was able to put the pen to the paper. He finally got the long-term deal that he coveted for so long. On Friday, the Giants and JPP agreed to terms on a four-year deal worth $62 million. With $40 million in guaranteed money, multiple sources have reported.

In the deal, it could get as high as $66 million. He also gets a $20 million signing bonus as well.

Think about this for a minute and let this set in.

Two years ago on the Fourth of July, it wasn’t even clear if JPP would ever play football again. After a fireworks accident that took place in causing severe damage to his right hand. Because of the injury, it caused the Giants to pull the long-term offer they had in place for JPP. That deal was reportedly worth $60 million. It wasn’t certain if the team’s star defensive end would ever play another down again.

He did return in November, but he looked off. Mostly because he was playing with a hand that was missing a couple of fingers. A hand that he had heavily wrapped up in lots of bandages and medical tape. Making his hand look like a club. His presence helped and after shaking the rust off from being away from a football field for several months, JPP looked like he could still play football.

He returned to the Giants on a one-year, prove-it deal in 2016 and proved that he could still be a dominating pass rusher and overall quality defensive end. In 12 games, he recorded seven sacks with 53 total tackles and at times, looked like the guy we all saw dominate in 2011. A sports hernia surgery forced JPP out for the final month of the season, but that did not stop him from getting the contract he wanted.

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The Giants wisely placed the franchise tag on Jason Pierre-Paul to prevent him from hitting the open market. As if JPP did hit the open market, a team like the Cleveland Browns or the Jacksonville Jaguars would be waiting with open arms and wallets. Even worse, a team like the Dallas Cowboys who are desperate for defense and pass rushers could sign him. Instead, they kept him off the market right off the bat with the franchise tag and gave themselves a chance to get this deal done.

All it took was 10 days and on St. Patrick’s Day, JPP went to East Rutherford, put his name to the paper. Pierre-Paul signed his name to the contract he wanted. Which, in turn, will now keep him as a member of the New York Giants for the next four seasons.

As much as the franchise tag would have been nice, a deal that would have paid him $17 million if he signed it, Jason Pierre-Paul got the thing he wanted most; long-term and financial security. It is what he wanted two years ago before the accident on the Fourth of July and it was what he hoped for when he signed the prove-it deal last March.

The Giants, on the flip side, keep their long-time pass rusher in uniform for the next four seasons and keep another core member of a defense that ranked in the top part of the NFL this past season. The Giants defense as is can definitely help win a Super Bowl and in an NFC that is wide open right now, the Giants could be the team that emerges next season, just as the Atlanta Falcons did this past year.

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JPP got what he wanted and the Giants kept their guy. In the end, it was a win-win for both sides.

What a story this was. Who saw it coming two years ago? Nobody did.

However, at the end of the day, Jason Pierre-Paul bet on himself and won. Now, he is a very rich man as a result.

Doug Rush
Doug Rush is a 12-year professional journalist who found his way to the Inscriber Digital Magazine in September of 2016. Before graduating college, his first ever job in the industry was with the Asbury Park Press in 2004 covering high school sports. After graduating from Ocean County College in 2007 and Ramapo College of New Jersey in 2009, he became a featured writer for Bleacher Report, covering both the New York Yankees and New York Giants from June of 2009 until his departure in 2013. In March of 2013, he joined Sports Media 101, where he was a featured writer for Giants 101 and the lead writer and editor for Yankees 101 and Knicks 101. He served there until leaving in July of 2016. Rush is current members of the Pro Football Writers Association of America and the Internet Baseball Writers Association of America.

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