Home>#INSCMagazine>Style: Proper Ways To Clean Clothes And Fabrics After Fire
#INSCMagazine Fashion Fashion/Style Men

Style: Proper Ways To Clean Clothes And Fabrics After Fire

INSCMagazine: Get Social!

Home fires are no joke and must never be treated lightly. Nothing is more important during this situation than the health and safety of the people living in your home – children, adult, and pets are all top priority before the structural and operational aspect of your home.

But even if the authorities give the all-clear for you to return to your residence, the recovery process of your home (whatever’s left of it) can be a handful. One of the most important pieces to restore, apart from food, bedrooms, and bathrooms, are your clothes and other pieces of fabric.


Home fires leave behind nasty soot stains and smoke odors on fabrics that can last for a good while if not removed immediately. Carpet, upholstery, clothing, drapery, and pillows are all affected by this.

Fortunately, the following tips provided by fire restoration experts can help you take care of your problems without having to replace anything in the end.

Getting Soot Out Of Fabric

Soot is the black flaky or powdery substance that is left behind by a fire. It is usually made up of very thin particles that are capable of moving as easily in the air as dust.

Before getting rid of the smell, your main goal is to get rid of the soot as it is the main source of the smell. Though unlike dust, removing soot can be tricky since it contains plenty of oils that can stain textiles.

For this, it would be better for you to work with a fire restore expert in order to avoid further damage to your clothing and fabric. But if you prefer to go at it on your own, then use a heavy duty vacuum cleaner and hold the nozzle right on top of the soot to prevent rubbing it into the surface that you’re trying to clean.

Deodorize Fabric And Clothing

When getting rid of dirt or smell, the first thing that usually comes to mind is having to throw your clothing and other pieces of fabric for washing. But that isn’t advised when it comes to soot and smoke odor.

That’s because the washer and the drier will only cause the smoke odor to set into the fabric, making it harder – if not impossible – to remove it.

You’d be much better off getting a professional as they can take care of this problem with ozone treatment. This process uses an oxidizing agent that breaks smoke molecules up and gets rid of the odor.

Cleaning Clothing And Fabrics After Deodorization

When the items have been deodorized, you have all the freedom to start cleaning them once again. Many pieces of textile, including clothing, towels, and bedding can run through the cycles of your washer and shower. Other items, including smaller rugs, drapery as well as clothing with special care fabrics can be taken to a dry cleaning professional.

For the larger items, including carpeting and furniture upholstery, it is recommended that you work with a cleaning expert since they have the appropriate tools and machinery that is best for textiles that need care.

Contact Experts For Further Advice

Fire-damage control experts like the ones at FROutlet, have specialized training in both handling and restoring clothes, structures, and other personal properties to normal from fire damage. So if you’re looking for any advice, in case you’re getting rid of soot and smoke odor on your own, then don’t hesitate to call a professional for guidance.

Conclusion

Getting rid of soot and the smoke odor can be both tricky and challenging. But with some proper planning and getting him from professionals, you can have everything restored to its former glory once again.

  • 1
    Share

Facebook Comments

Robert D. Cobb
Founder, Publisher and CEO of INSCMagazine. Works have appeared and featured in places such as Forbes, Huffington Post, ESPN and NBC Sports to name a few. Follow me on Twitter at @RobCobb_INSC, email me at robert.cobb@theinscribermag.com

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.