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WWE: Ranking Every Wrestlemania from Worst to Best

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In three weeks time, Wrestlemania 33 will take place from Orlando, Florida; just the second time in history that the city of Orlando will get to host the event. The last time Orlando played host to Wrestlemania; Ric Flair’s career in WWE came to an end at the hands of a Sweet Chin Music from Shawn Michaels.

Over the next few weeks, the card for the 33rd installment of Wrestlemania will start to build with matches like Brock Lesnar vs Bill Goldberg, The Undertaker vs Roman Reigns and Randy Orton vs Bray Wyatt headlining the event. Also over the next few weeks, we’ll see the highlights of older Wrestlemania moments, especially from the clips of the people who will be entering the WWE Hall of Fame the night before.

If you’re fortunate enough to have the WWE Network, you can re-live a lot of the moments and memories from past Wrestlemanias. Which ones are worth watching on the network? Which ones are worth skipping over?

In this article, we’ll break down and rank every Wrestlemania from worst to best.

32. Wrestlemania 9- April 4, 1993: Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, NV

Taking place at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas, Wrestlemania IX was supposed to be the first Wrestlemania as part of the post Hulk Hogan era and featured a decent main event between Bret Hart and Yokozuna for the WWF Title. Yokozuna’s win didn’t last very long, with Hogan, who competed in a tag team match earlier in the night, came rushing out and competed in an impromptu main event match for the WWF Title and Hogan captured his fifth championship to end the show. They needed Hogan to energize the crowd because the show was pretty awful. The opening match for the Intercontinental Title between Shawn Michaels and Tatanka was the best match on the card. From that point on, the event didn’t get much better and this is considered one of the worst Wrestlemania’s ever put together.

31. Wrestlemania 11- April 2, 1995: Hartford Civic Center, Hartford, CT

This event got a lot of publicity from the sports world due to the fact that it featured former New York Giants’ linebacker Lawrence Taylor squaring off against Bam Bam Bigelow in the one and only time that LT ever stepped in a wrestling ring. He held up for 11 minutes and ended the match with a flying forearm smash from the second rope to Bigelow and got the win. The match was more spectacle that anything else. The real main event was the WWF Title Match between Shawn Michaels and Diesel, who had an extraordinary match and ended up with Diesel getting the win. Bret Hart and Bob Backlund had a decent “I Quit” Match with Roddy Piper as the referee.

30. Wrestlemania 2- April 2, 1986: Nassau Coliseum, Uniondale, NY; Rosemont Horizon, Chicago, IL; Sports Arena, Los Angeles, CA

What was unique, and quite frankly, strange, of this event was that it took place from three different venues; New York, Chicago and Los Angeles; with each venue hosting a “main event” to end the segment. In New York, Roddy Piper and Mr. T fought in a Boxing Match that ended with Piper being disqualified after he body-slammed actor. In Chicago, they played host to an NFL/WWF 20-man battle royal that thankfully, a wrestler won with Andre the Giant winning when he last eliminated Bret Hart. In Los Angeles, the main event was a steel cage match for the WWF Title between then champion Hulk Hogan and challenger King Kong Bundy. Hogan successfully defended by escaping the cage.

29. Wrestlemania 27- April 3, 2011: Georgia Dome, Atlanta, GA

It was probably a thrill for someone like The Miz to be able to highlight Wrestlemania after being known as reality star from MTV, but after six years in the WWE, he was the champion defending against John Cena and ended up winning the match with help of The Rock; a move that set up the following year’s event between Cena and the Rock. But in reality, the main event was something more for a main event for Monday Night Raw as opposed to being the headline match for Wrestlemania.

The highlight of the night was the No Holds Barred Match between the Undertaker and Triple H; a match that The Undertaker ended up winning and the second time the Undertaker got a win over Triple H; they had battled 10 years earlier. Edge won in his last match of his career by defeating Alberto Del Rio in the World Heavyweight Title Match and Randy Orton and CM Punk also had a decent match in this rather bad card.

28. Wrestlemania 1- March 31, 1985: Madison Square Garden, New York, NY

The first Wrestlemania will always get talked about mostly because it was the very first, but as far as an overall event goes, it wasn’t exactly a highlight reel of a card. Hulk Hogan and Mr. T teamed up to face Roddy Piper and Paul Orndorff with Muhammad Ali as the guest referee, who stayed on the outside. Pat Patterson was the referee in the ring for the match with Hogan and Mr. T winning. Andre the Giant won the $15,000 Bodyslam Contest when he slammed Big John Studd to the mat and then started to throw the money to the crowd before Bobby Heenan intercepted the bag. King Kong Bundy defeated S.D. Jones in just nine seconds.

27. Wrestlemania 32- April 3, 2016: AT&T Stadium, Dallas, TX

The event broke a 29-year record held by Wrestlemania III for the attendance record, which was at 93,173 at the Pontiac Silverdome. At AT&T Stadium in Dallas, the attendance was 101,763, a number that is still being disputed by some, but for now, the event has the record for WWE. The event featured a WWE World Heavyweight Championship match between Roman Reigns and Triple H; a match many didn’t want to see since fans were tired of Reigns being forced as a main event star, but he ended up walking away with the belt after losing it earlier in the year at the Royal Rumble. The highlight of the night was the Hell in a Cell Match between the Undertaker and Shane McMahon with Shane jumping off the top of the cage and hitting the announcers table. Chris Jericho and AJ Styles had a pretty solid match, as did Brock Lesnar and Dean Ambrose.

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Doug Rush
Doug Rush is a 12-year professional journalist who found his way to the Inscriber Digital Magazine in September of 2016. Before graduating college, his first ever job in the industry was with the Asbury Park Press in 2004 covering high school sports. After graduating from Ocean County College in 2007 and Ramapo College of New Jersey in 2009, he became a featured writer for Bleacher Report, covering both the New York Yankees and New York Giants from June of 2009 until his departure in 2013. In March of 2013, he joined Sports Media 101, where he was a featured writer for Giants 101 and the lead writer and editor for Yankees 101 and Knicks 101. He served there until leaving in July of 2016. Rush is current members of the Pro Football Writers Association of America and the Internet Baseball Writers Association of America.

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